Java and Soft References

In a previous post, I described what weak references were and how the JVM interacted with them and how they contrasted with strong references. In summary, a strong reference is what we typically think of as a reference in Java; that is, when we instantiate an object and assign its reference to a variable, that is a strong reference. Obviously, these objects will not be cleared by the garbage collector (GC) until the reference is removed.

By contrast, a weak reference doesn’t prevent the garbage collector from clearing the referred object. That is, if the only references that remain to an object are weak references, that object will be treated as if there are no strong references to it, and thus it will be cleared by the GC on its next run. Weak references are implemented mainly by the WeakReference “wrapper” and WeakHashMap, the latter of which only maintains weak references to the keys, so that once the keys are inaccessible (i.e. no strong references exist), the WeakHashMap will automatically drop/remove the corresponding entries, which can also make the value objects eligible for GC so as long as there are no other references to them.

But how do these references contrast with a soft reference?

Continued